Common foot injuries.

Specialized training lets us provide personalized care.

Our singular focus is on the foot—its structure, function, and intricacies. That means your foot injury
will be treated with the very latest technology and techniques by some of the most competent, caring,
and compassionate doctors you’ll ever encounter. We treat you like family. Because to us, you are.

Below are some of the injuries we treat on a regular basis.

ACHILLES RUPTURE


Description

A partial or total rupture typically occurs 30-40 minutes into an activity and nearly always happen from a sudden explosive movement or bending the foot upwards (dorsiflexion). It causes pain, swelling, and can greatly impair function.

Treatment

Surgery is almost always required—and the sooner, the better. Chances of a successful outcome decrease in ruptures untreated for longer than two days. In rare cases, the leg may be put in a cast and allowed to heal without surgery.

Recovery

Six to 12 months. A full rehabilitation program is necessary following surgery to restore the strength and flexibility of the tendon and surrounding muscles. The goal is to gradually return you to your normal activity and level of participation.

FRACTURE/BREAK


Description

Fracture and break refer to the same condition. Fractures occur most commonly as the result of an accident, sports injury, or trauma. They can range from minor (stress fractures in a runner’s foot) to severe (a compound fracture that breaks through the skin).

Treatment

Some fractures only require a cast or splint to keep the bone properly aligned as it heals. Surgery may be required to restore normal bone alignment and function. Pins, screws, plates, or wires may be used to maintain the corrected position.

Recovery

Usually, six to eight weeks. Pain normally stops before the fracture has fully healed. You may have a physical therapy program and exercises designed to build up your muscle strength and flexibility in the injured area.

SPRAINS/STRAINS


Description

The stretching or tearing of the ligaments that connect bones. Sprains can be mild, moderate, or severe. If you have diabetes or impaired circulation or feeling in your feet, any level of sprain needs prompt medical attention.

Treatment

Mild sprains usually only require RICE: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. A splint or boot is a common treatment for moderate and severe sprains as is medication to control pain and swelling. A cane or crutches may also be used.

Recovery

Mild strains heal in a few weeks. Severe sprains can take two months to heal and may require physical therapy. It’s important to protect your injured foot while it heals and continue to wear any support device your doctor applies.

TORN TENDON


Description

Tendon injuries can occur suddenly or develop over time. They are common in people who participate in sports that involve repetitive ankle motion. People with higher arches are also at risk for developing tendon tears.

Treatment

Repair involves an operation to knit a tear or reconnect the ends of a torn tendon. If the injury is severe, a tendon graft may be required. The area is also thoroughly checked for injuries to nerves and blood vessels.

Recovery

Six to eight weeks. The repaired tendon is immobilized with a splint or cast and no weight bearing is allowed for several weeks after surgery. Physical therapy helps reduce scar tissue formation and improve strength and range of motion.

TURF TOE


Description

A sprain of the main (MTP) joint of the big toe. It happens when the toe is forcibly bent upward—such as when pushing off into a sprint—and the toe gets stuck flat on the ground. Often associated with football, turf toe occurs in a wide range of sports and activities.

Treatment

Grade 1 (mild) sprains are commonly treated with tape or orthotics. With Grade 2 (moderate) sprains, a walking boot may be prescribed. Grade 3 (severe) sprains call for immobilization in a boot or cast. Surgery may be required in some severe cases.

Recovery

From one to several weeks depending on severity. Physical therapy should start as soon as symptoms allow. Early joint movement, with exercises to stretch and strengthen the big toe, is essential to reduce or prevent chronic stiffness.

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